FEROZ Feroz (Crossover Prog, 2014)

Review by andrea — Feroz is Mexican band from Chihuahua that was formed in 2011. In December 2014 they self-released a very interesting
eponymous debut album with a line up featuring Marli Espinoza (vocals), Carlos Enrique Pineda (keyboards), Alfredo
Santana (bass) and Eli Rafael Carranza (drums). According to their website, they try to interpret with their music the
sounds of the desert and of the cities of Northern Mexico. I don't know if they reached their goal, but for sure on this
work the band showcase great musicianship and songwriting skills blending jazz, prog, folklore, ethnic flavours and every
now and again even a touch of electronica. The female vocals in Spanish are clear, always confident and warm, the organ
and keyboard work is excellent and the rhythm section always ready to set off for sudden changes in atmosphere and
tempo. The experimental attitude of the band never looses contact with melody and they are even able to incorporate
mariachi music in rock structures in an effective way. When I stumbled in this band for me it was very good surprise.
Anyway, you can listen to the album on bandcamp, so have a try and judge by yourselves!

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ALCEST Écailles De Lune (Experimental/Post Metal, 2010)

Review by ProgAlia — The main word that comes to mind for this album: Gorgeous. A few others: Ethereal, dreamy, lush, soothing. Maybe
sometimes also intense or somber. It's a succinct and heavily atmospheric album that knows its sound and knows
what it wants to do with it, and thus ends up being quite a joy to listen to.
I like the unpredictability of the songs.The harsh vocals bring a whole new level to Alcest's music. Far from being
depressing, this album is beautiful, tinged with nostalgia as always.
ALCEST combines several elements from shoegaze, black metal, ambient, and progressive all into one album. which is
extremely impressive and something not a lot of bands can pull off and sound GREAT doing it.
For fans of atmosphere and relatively pleasant-sounding, Écailles de lune is one of the most interesting and
fascinating albums you will ever hear.

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GAZPACHO March Of Ghosts (Crossover Prog, 2012)

Review by ProgAlia — This is one of the brightest post-rock/progressive albums, knowing that Gazpacho makes a type of progressive/post
artsy alternative rock that is similar to Marillion, Anathema, Kent or Porcupine Tree. It's slow, plodding post-rock with
melancholy melodies, diverse instruments and wistful vocals.
March of the Ghosts, the band's 7th record and second on KScope, is what I would call a really good record . I love the
instrumentation and the writing and the band's hybrid progressive sound definitely fits in with labelmates Porcupine
Tree and Anathema, which is a great compliment to the band. The 4 intertwined tracks 'Hell Freezes Over' I-IV, have a
really beautiful, anthemic chorus that finally culminates in something that borders on 'heavy' on the final track of the
album.

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AMPHETAMIN A Flood Of Strange Sensations (Crossover Prog, 2016)

Review by ProgAlia — A Flood Of Strange Sensations album combines everything from art rock to post rock. Sebastian presents very
melodic music twisted just enough to make it feel foreign and strange.
Musically, it is misleading at first. It seems straight forward but after a few listens, you discover there's a lot going on.
The songs have plenty of space and atmosphere but at the same time, nothing is obvious. Sebastian has a unique
voice and a fondness for falsetto.
"Neverland" is shoegaze played by a doom band. "Once Upon a Tree" and "Thoughts in the Water" feel like a post rock
band covering Roxy Music. There's a flood going on underneath the surface of "A Flood of Strange Sensations." If you
like to be swept away by a tide wave of falsetto and texturized music, look no further as Amphetamin is the drug for
you.

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FILULAS JUZ Astralopithecus (Jazz Rock/Fusion, 2015)

Review by ProgAlia — Filulas Juz is an impressive instrumental jazz-rock unit featuring drums (Adriano Morales is an impressive drummer
all around, guiding the group through a variety of styles), bassist Luigino Mar'n, guitarist Armando Cuevas, with Fender
Rhodes and flute player Jos' Javier Rodriguez doubling on both instruments; guest player Pablo Olaya contributes
Rhodes on several cuts, trumpeter Alejandro Sierra plays on a number of others as well, along with percussionist
Francisco Jim'nez.
Most of the time on the nine tracks, the sliding scale tips far closer to the jazz element, with the Fender Rhodes often
recalling Chick Corea's playing, but with the rest of the group they truly forge their own identity. While drums and bass
create some stunning grooves, one would be remiss to label this fusion, as the overall identity of their sound generally
takes on a much lighter feel, without the heaviness. The odd track here is 'Green Dolphin Skit,' with spoken lyrics in
Spanish from guest Juan Regueiro, making it the only track on the entire album with any kind of vocals. The guitar and
keyboard interplay on the title tracks sets up beautiful and stirring passages for trumpet, guitar and keyboard solos,
while drums confidently leads the group through numerous irregular rhythms. The entire group gets a chance to
shine on the epic 'Voyager' as the piece builds and morphs into the closer 'Xena,' with a dreamy bass solo followed by
some strange effected moves, eventually giving way to some spirited ensemble work that truly makes these two the
most adventurous pieces of the nine. Looking forward to their next release.

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VERBAL DELIRIUM From The Small Hours Of Weakness (Crossover Prog, 2013)

Review by ProgAlia — This prog band from Greece, have quite a wide range in their musical radius , sometimes sounding like Pink Floyd, with
very spacey soundscapes, sometimes sounding like a cross between Van Der Graaf Generator and Audience, not to
mention some very beautiful intervals of pure brilliant symphonic prog! . They manage to go all over the progmap
without loosing their identity and most impressive they create these mentioned spheres with "simple" means,
keyboard (piano) bass, drums and superb vocals, be it lead vocal and/or harmony vocals/choir, add to that some great
flute, saxophone, trumpet intervals, yes there are guitars just not used in the traditional prog way, all instruments
seems integrated in the total sound picture of this very exciting new band, which is very impressing.
FROM THE SMALL HOURS OF WEAKNESS is a very pleasant and surprising album, it has got to be one
of the best surprises of the year in the prog realm!! Once you have heard them you will agree.

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EMERSON LAKE AND PALMER Live at Montreux 1997 (Symphonic Prog, 2015)

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush — This Montreux concert is an ELP performance from 1997. I owned the DVD and loved the music so it was worth checking out the
CD.

ELP in the late 90s were a cohesive unit and put a lot of effort into this performance but they are not as good as they used to be,
comparing to the dynamic energy of Isle of Wight 1970 and the exuberance of California Jam 1974. This is a very impressive
setlist overall with some of the best the band have done. The supergroup loosen up a bit midway through the concert, perhaps
that is the effect of Knife Edge, such a great song. Take A Pebble is the definitive highlight for me, an incredible song the band
seem to enjoy, and a song that drew me to this band in the first place.

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YES The Ladder (Symphonic Prog, 1999)

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush — Yes redeem themselves after a slew of mediocrity in the 90s with "The Ladder". From the outset there is a huge leap back into
progressive territory on the opening track Homeworld. Clocking over 9 minutes and full of wonderful instrumental sections
and the awesome vocals of Anderson with reflective lyrics, one wonders where the band had disappeared to on their last
album "Open Your Eyes". The keyboard workouts of Igor Khoroshev are great, he is now an official member, and it has a
definite progressive structure, with a rather provocative ending with wind blowing and Anderson singing to a lonely piano. Its
a wonderful way to begin this album.

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GANDALF'S FIST A Day in the Life of a Universal Wanderer (Special Edition) (Neo-Prog, 2017)

Review by CeeJayGee — I enjoyed the 2013 release of Gandalf's Fist's A Day In The Life Of A Universal Wanderer and I checked back to see how it is rated in its year of release ? it is currently 67th. I was a little surprised to see the Deluxe Edition newly released appear high up in the 2017 album chart. I was expecting a longer / dramatically developed album. The 2013 release has 11 tracks and the 2017 release 15 tracks. The weakest track on the 2013 release, Maze of Corridors has been dispensed with and is replaced by The Stowaway and the Endless Night, a fine addition. Otherwise the extra tracks are short narrative fillers. I rated the original album a four star in its year of release but for me this album should not be riding high in the 2017 chart and I have rated it two stars for that reason alone. However I accept that it is difficult for any annual ratings chart to distinguish re-releases, which this effectively is, from original studio albums (ironically the album currently No 2 in the 2013 chart is the re-release of Camel's The Snowgoose!).

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